organoid

Nephrotic syndrome in a dish

Our recent publication in Pediatric Nephrology. February 2019 Nephrotic syndrome in a dish: recent developments in modeling in vitro. In this review, we highlight the molecular basis of nephrotic syndrome and discuss requirements to accurately study nephrotic syndrome in vitro, including an overview of specific podocyte markers, cutting-edge stem cell organoids, and the implementation of microfluidic platforms. The development of (patho) physiologically relevant glomerular models will accelerate the identification of molecular targets involved in nephrotic syndrome and may be the harbinger of a new era of therapeutic avenues.

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A huge surface

A huge surface A microscopic image scan of a cross-section of a mouse kidney. Different microscopic images are digitally stitched together to create this image. The bright fluorescent green structures are the brush borders within the kidney. Both kidneys together filter 200 liters of fluid every 24 hours. The filtrate is further processed and concentrated to the 1,5 liter of urine we normally pee throughout the day. The filtrate is processed in specialized tubes (nephrons). A human kidney has about one million nephrons, and the total length of the nephrons in the kidney is about 40 miles! The inside of …

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“Bright” podocytes

    “Bright” podocytes A microscopic image scan of a whole mouse kidney. Different microscopic images are digitally stitched together to create this image. The bright fluorescent cells are podocytes. This cell type is important for the filtration of the blood. The podocyte cell body is stained in green and the nucleus in pink. Using these fluorescent markers, we can visualize the podocytes and thus the glomeruli (the kidney filters).

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